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Best CBG Oil – Buyer’s Guide for 2020

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Have you ever heard about CBG Oil? – No, it’s not a typo, we are talking about CBG oil, a new product derived from a new hemp extract – CBG. Far more popular nowadays is the CBD oil because it has even become an essential part of many people’s wellness routine. However, this CBG oil is a newly introduced product on the market and it seems that it has already won people’s hearts. Try the CBD — a company based in Colorado — breaks down the basics of CBG to help you decide if it is right for you.

What exactly is a CBG oil, how it’s used, and what are the benefits of this product? – These are some of the questions that come up when speaking about this product and all are answered in this guide on the best CBG oil available for sale.

What is CBG Oil

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First things first, let’s see what is CBG and what is CBG oil. If you are familiar with CBD, you probably are aware of the fact that apart from CBD there are about one hundred other cannabinoids naturally occurring in the cannabis or hemp plant.

Cannabinoids are chemical compounds most of which have some therapeutic benefits in treating certain health conditions. CBG is one of these cannabinoids and the abbreviation stands for cannabigerol. CBG is the main component of the CBG oil which is used similarly to CBD oil.

As it is one of the many cannabinoids in the hemp plant, next to THC, CBD, CBC, or CBN, it would be logical to assume that these are all related. However, CBG is considered to be the precursor or the stem cell of all of the cannabinoids. In other words, all cannabinoids originate from the raw version of CBG. For that reason, CBG is often referred to as the “mother cannabinoid”.

It’s worth mentioning that when a hemp plant is fully grown the level of CBG is usually 1% or less. Thus most full-spectrum products have a low level of CBG. Anyway, to obtain higher levels of CBG, manufacturers need to harvest the plants earlier in the growth cycle.

CBG oil vs CBD Oil

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In comparison, CBG and CBD are similar cannabinoids in a way that both are non-psychoactive and possess therapeutic properties. Moreover, both are used in the production of CBG oil as well as in full-spectrum and broad-spectrum CBD oil. These two extracts combined with the rest work together synergistically much better than they do separately. As a result, these types of CBD oils give the so-called “entourage effect”.

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In fact, most CBD brands use a 1:1 ratio of CBD and CBG in producing the CBG oil, and in that way, they increase the beneficial properties of the product. Generally speaking, CBG and CBD are alike, both interact with the endocannabinoid system to promote a general sense of well-being.

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Still, some studies show that CBG is more effective than CBD in treating certain conditions. Mainly, the fact that these two cannabinoids are different, it means that they can have different effects on your body.

Best CBG Oil on the Market Reviewed

Due to the fact that CBG oil is a relatively new product on the market, there aren’t many CBD companies that sell it. Try the CBD has done our research and managed to find the most reputable brands where you can buy the best CBG oil. Here are our top 5 picks.

Try The CBD

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Key Features

–      1:1 ratio CBG-CBD

–      500mg CBG + 500mg CBD per Bottle

–      Made from organic hemp grown in Colorado

–      Tested by a third-party lab

–      Affordable price

The ideal balance of CBG and CBD in this product by Try The CBD provides the optimal effects that these cannabinoids can give to any user. For a reason, it is our first choice when it comes to CBG oil, but also for any other CBD products.

Try The CBD is a brand that has found its place on the market selling high-quality CBD products made from organic non-GMO hemp that is grown in the fields of Colorado. This new product only confirms that this brand takes no chances in quality as it provides exactly what each CBD user needs. From CBG oil to CBD gummies, capsules, creams, and every product has been tested by a third-party lab to verify its content for quality and purity.

Not only that you can get the finest CBG oil from Try The CBD, but it won’t cost you a fortune to enjoy its benefits. At their shop, you can buy CBG oil that contains a total of 1000mg cannabinoids – 500mg CBD and 500mg CBG in a 30ml bottle. Lastly, you can rest assured that the CBG oil by Try The CBD contains less than 0.3% of THC which makes it non-psychoactive.

Medterra

Key Features

–      Isolate (THC-free)

–      CBG + CBD tincture with a 1:1 ratio

–      Citrus-flavored

–      Two potencies – 1000mg and 2000mg

Medterra offers CBG oil tinctures with two different potencies – one of 1000mg and another of 2000mg. This equals a 1:1 ratio of CBD and CBG in each bottle. The difference with this CBG oil is that it does not contain full-spectrum extract as it has no traces of THC.

The CBG oil by Medterra is made with organic MCT oil and organically-grown hemp. Moreover, each product that they sell is tested by a third-party lab for quality.

Apart from CBD and CBG, these oil tinctures contain CBD, CBG, CBN, CBC, and CBDV. The CBG oil with a lower potency has 33mg of CBD+CBG per serving, while the stronger one contains 66mg of CBD+CBG per serving.

CBDistillery

Key Features

–      Full-spectrum CBG oil with a 1:1 ratio of CBG to CBD

–      MCT Oil and Natural Terpenes

–      Tested by a third-party lab

–      1000mg of CBG+CBD

CBDistillery is another reputable brand that offers CBG oil for sale. This product,the same as the top two on our list, contains a 1:1 ratio of CBG with CBD to make it a total of 1000mg per 30ml bottle. Other than CBG oil, here you can find a CBG isolate powder that can be used as an additive in food or drinks.

The CBG oil by CBDistillery is made with MCT oil and natural terpenes to provide a better experience. This CBD brand cares about quality and for that reason sends all products to a third-party lab to test their content.

LeafyWell

Key Features

–      Full-spectrum CBG oil

–      Different fruity flavors

–      1000mg CBG+CBD

–      THC – less than 0.3%

LeafyWell offers a potent CBG oil available in three different flavors – blueberry, orange blossom, and watermelon. It is a 100% organic full spectrum CBG oil with natural non-GMO ingredients.

This brand also tests all its products through a third-party lab to verify quality and purity. LeafyWell CBG oil contains less than 0.3% THC as it has a full-spectrum extract in its content. It has no sugar and the CBG is extracted from organic hemp grown in Colorado.

Extract Labs

Key Features

–      CBG Oil and CBG Powder available

–      Broad-spectrum and full-spectrum

–      Lab-tested

–      500mg CBG + 500mg CBD

Extract Labs is a Colorado-based CBD brand that offers different CBG products. At their shop, you can find full-spectrum CBG oil with a 1:1 ratio of 500mg CBG with 500mg CBD, broad-spectrum CBG oil, and CBG isolate powder.

If you are looking for a more potent CBG oil you can try the broad-spectrum CBG oil tinctures that contain 1000mg CBD and 1000mg CBG. Extract Labs use the CO2 extraction method to obtain the extracts from organic hemp grown in the Colorado fields. Each product by Extract Labs is tested by a third-party lab and contains no pesticides, herbicides, solvents, or chemical fertilizers.

Benefits of Using CBG Oil

CBG oil is widely used for the purpose of getting comfort, a sense of calmness, and stress relief. Essentially, users have reported great benefits from using CBG oil for sleep or treating insomnia, to stay focused, and to relieve inflammation.

According to Try the CBD, there is even some anecdotal evidence showing that CBG oil may be useful in treating various diseases and conditions. While these medical studies have been conducted mainly on animals, and are very limited, this may encourage more researchers to study the potential of CBG oil.

For instance, a 2014 study shows that CBG oil helped with slowing the growth of colon cancer cells in mice. Another indicates that it stimulates the appetite of rats and it even reduced inflammation associated with colitis.

It seems that CBG has also great effects on the brain cells and can protect them from the effects of aging. A study conducted in Spain in 2015 showed that CBG was extremely active as a neuroprotectant as it helped in the treatment of Huntington’s Disease in mice, a neurodegenerative disorder that is common for humans as well.

Based on all these studies and the positive experiences of CBG oil users it is clear that there is great potential in this product. Hopefully, there will be more medical studies about it in the future to verify the effects of CBG oil.

Potential Side Effects of CBG Oil

As a potential CBG oil user, you must be concerned about any possible side effects that may appear by using this product. To better understand any effects from CBG oil of course more studies are required. Anyway, according to the feedback from many users, CBG oil acts similarly to CBD oil, which means that you could expect the same possible side effects. If you have experience with other CBD products you probably know what to expect.

The most common side effects which are usually very mild are nausea or drowsiness, which may appear if you take a higher dose of CBG oil. It is recommended that you lower your dosage if you feel these or any similar effects. On top of that, when you take any prescription medication you should always consult with your doctor before taking CBG oil. It may happen that you don’t feel the effects of your medication, or of the CBG oil, and these two may interact and cause some side effects.

How to Use CBG Oil – Best Practice

To fully experience the benefits of CBG oil it is best to try one of the products that contain a higher level of CBG. Undoubtedly, you would get some effects of CBG when consuming full-spectrum or broad-spectrum CBD oil, however, its amount is too low to get the wanted effects. Thus choosing a CBG oil from one of the above-mentioned brands would be the right choice for you.

In addition, you should always verify the quality of the product by checking the CBD company that sells it. For instance, our list of the best CBG oil was made based on the brand. We checked if the product has been tested for purity and quality by a third-party lab, whether the CBG was extracted from organic hemp, and what type of extraction methods were used in the process. So, if you find a CBG oil made from this type of reputable CBD brand you can rest assured that you get a quality product.

CBG oil is usually sold in the same way as the CBD oil – as tinctures. Hence it is taken sublingually. Alternatively, you can try using CBG isolate powder as a food or drink additive.

Recommended Dosage for CBG Oil

When it comes to dosage, usually the same applies to all CBD products. There is no standard recommended dosage of CBG oil, Try the CBD suggests to start low and work your way up. Simply put, if you are trying CBG oil for the first time, get only a low dosage or 1 to 2 drops of oil per day. Once you feel comfortable with this you should increase the dosage.

Keep in mind that taking CBG oil is a process that requires patience. This means that you shouldn’t expect to feel its effects after the first drop of CBG oil. As with most CBD products, consistency is key. Make sure to take your dose regularly and for better results, you can combine the CBG oil with another CBD product.

Final Thoughts

Ultimately, finding the best CBG oil for sale and incorporating it into your everyday wellness routine is a similar process to getting any other CBD product. The most important aspects to consider are the quality of products, reputation of the CBD brand, and your own personal habits. Many people have different preferences and mainly choose their ideal product based on their own lifestyles. If you would like to try CBG oil, follow this buyer’s from Try the CBD, and choose wisely.

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Women in the newsroom: Why South Africa leads the way

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Mahlatse Mahlase is group editor-in-chief of Eyewitness News, a major broadcaster in South Africa. It’s a role she would have been unlikely to fill 30 years ago, under the apartheid regime, whose hierarchy put Black women on a bottom tier.

But no matter where you look in the world, women’s leadership in the news media has lagged – and still does. South Africa, in fact, is a relative success story. Today, women lead nearly half of the country’s major publications and broadcasters, according to a recent analysis by Oxford University. That puts it ahead of the United States, the United Kingdom, and even countries held up as models of gender parity, like Finland.

Yet South African women’s gains have been especially hard-won, and incomplete. Women hold few of journalism’s purse strings, for instance. 

Ms. Mahlase says she has reflected on representation through a new prism since she gave birth seven months ago to her first child, a boy. 

“I want my son to grow up in a world where he has female bosses,” she says. “I want him to grow up listening to women experts on the radio, hearing them as contributors to changing the world and not just as victims of an unfair system.”

Johannesburg

Nwabisa Makunga can point to the exact moment she knew she would become a journalist.

It was April 1993 and she was 11 years old, watching the TV broadcast of the funeral of assassinated anti-apartheid leader Chris Hani with her family in their living room. The presenter was a Black reporter named Noxolo Grootboom, and her powerful tribute to Mr. Hani brought Ms. Makunga’s parents to tears.

“She was a woman who looked like me, who spoke like me, telling the story of a man who had been so important to people from my community,” she recalls. “I said to myself – this is what I’m going to do. I’m going to be like Noxolo, and I’m going to tell stories.”

Three decades later, Ms. Makunga is the editor-in-chief of the Sowetan, one of South Africa’s most-circulated daily newspapers. She is part of a generation of women who have risen through the ranks to take leadership of many of the country’s most important news outlets. Today, these women – most of them Black, Asian, and multiracial – lead nearly half the country’s major publications and broadcasters, according to a recent analysis by Oxford University. That makes the country a global leader for women’s leadership in the media, putting it ahead of the United States, the United Kingdom, and even countries held up as models of gender parity, like Finland.

And the achievement is doubly remarkable in South Africa, where only a generation ago the entire country was run largely by white men. Editors like Ms. Makunga grew up not only with few role models who looked like them, but also in a world where the media was used as a weapon of the apartheid regime, premised on white supremacy – enforcing a hierarchy in which they were the bottom tier.

Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images/File

A vendor sells a Daily Sun edition honoring former South African President Nelson Mandela’s birthday on July 18, 2013. The country’s transition to democracy opened up opportunities for many of today’s journalists.

Hard-won gains

Even after apartheid formally ended, these editors came up in newsrooms where its effects lingered. They were told their accents were “too African,” or their looks “too tempting.” Even as the newsrooms around them began to change from mostly white to mostly not, they still found themselves edged out of the pub trips and golf games where their male colleagues networked their way to the top.

“Make no mistake: Those statistics changing are the result of a fight,” says Mahlatse Mahlase, group editor-in-chief of Eyewitness News, a major breaking-news broadcaster. Women in South Africa’s newsrooms “have fought racism and they’ve also fought the patriarchy. The discrimination came from every side.”

Although they’ve now arrived, many of these same leaders note that South Africa’s media transformation remains incomplete. Women hold few of journalism’s purse strings, for instance. Just 19% of the board members at media companies here are female, according to a 2018 academic study of women in the media called “Glass Ceilings.” The vast majority of the country’s major media houses have a male CEO.

And while the proportion of Black, Asian, and multiracial women in the top echelons of South African media companies has grown from 6% in 2006 to 30% in 2018, that number still lags, in a country where they represent 46% of the population, according to the Glass Ceilings survey. Once they get there, meanwhile, they’re often placed under intense scrutiny and pressure.

“When men get to the top of their profession, they’re celebrated. When women get there, particularly Black women, there’s backlash, there’s trolling, there’s bullying,” says Glenda Daniels, an associate professor of media studies at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and the co-author of the Glass Ceilings study. She uses the term “Black” as it is frequently applied in South Africa, to describe anyone who is not white. “Women at the top find they’re often exhausted just proving over and over that they deserve to be in the room.”

“Newsrooms figured out they needed to mimic what was happening in society so they wouldn’t end up on the wrong side of history.” – Mapula Nkosi, editor of the Daily Sun

Coming up the ladder

In 1994, the same year Nelson Mandela took the oath as South Africa’s first Black president, an ambitious young reporter named Mapula Nkosi walked into the Johannesburg newsroom of the Weekly Mail, which made its name opposing apartheid, to begin her career as a cadet reporter.

When she looked up the ranks, she says, she saw only men. But all around her, the country had a new buzzword: transformation. The process was often fuzzy, but the objective was clear: The structures that ruled the country should look more like the people who lived in it.

“Those newsrooms figured out they needed to mimic what was happening in society so they wouldn’t end up on the wrong side of history,” says Ms. Nkosi, now the editor of the Daily Sun, the country’s most-circulated daily newspaper. “The whole time I was coming up I had people on one side of me saying, ‘We don’t understand why you’re in this position,’ and people on the other side saying, ‘We are so excited to see where you go.’”

Those competing forces followed many of South Africa’s women journalists through their rise. Each time they pulled themselves up another rung on the ladder, they heard whispers – that they only got this job because leadership wanted a woman, that they’d never make it.

But when they did, the conversation changed.

“When you do well, you become almost genderless,” says Paula Fray, a media consultant and the first woman to edit the Saturday Star, a major South African newspaper. “But if you don’t do well, then your failings represent your whole gender.”

Meanwhile, women leaders in the newsroom “carry the added responsibility of making these environments more welcoming for women,” says Mary Papayya, a veteran journalist and editor who now sits on the board of the South African Broadcasting Corp. That, she notes, is a particularly difficult task at a time when many outlets have seen their budgets slashed and are now contending with a pandemic that has made news reporting both more dangerous and less lucrative.

And the fight for change goes beyond who sits in the corner office. In South Africa, like many countries, men are disproportionately both the experts and subjects of news stories. A recent analysis of the South African media’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic by the organization Media Monitoring Africa, for instance, found that 80% of those quoted in stories about the virus were men.

Ms. Mahlase, the radio news editor, says she sees these kinds of statistics through a new prism since she gave birth seven months ago to her first child, a boy. 

“I want my son to grow up in a world where he has female bosses,” she says. “I want him to grow up listening to women experts on the radio, hearing them as contributors to changing the world and not just as victims of an unfair system.”

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Women in the newsroom: Why South Africa leads the way

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Mahlatse Mahlase is group editor-in-chief of Eyewitness News, a major broadcaster in South Africa. It’s a role she would have been unlikely to fill 30 years ago, under the apartheid regime, whose hierarchy put Black women on a bottom tier.

But no matter where you look in the world, women’s leadership in the news media has lagged – and still does. South Africa, in fact, is a relative success story. Today, women lead nearly half of the country’s major publications and broadcasters, according to a recent analysis by Oxford University. That puts it ahead of the United States, the United Kingdom, and even countries held up as models of gender parity, like Finland.

Yet South African women’s gains have been especially hard-won, and incomplete. Women hold few of journalism’s purse strings, for instance. 

Ms. Mahlase says she has reflected on representation through a new prism since she gave birth seven months ago to her first child, a boy. 

“I want my son to grow up in a world where he has female bosses,” she says. “I want him to grow up listening to women experts on the radio, hearing them as contributors to changing the world and not just as victims of an unfair system.”

Johannesburg

Nwabisa Makunga can point to the exact moment she knew she would become a journalist.

It was April 1993 and she was 11 years old, watching the TV broadcast of the funeral of assassinated anti-apartheid leader Chris Hani with her family in their living room. The presenter was a Black reporter named Noxolo Grootboom, and her powerful tribute to Mr. Hani brought Ms. Makunga’s parents to tears.

“She was a woman who looked like me, who spoke like me, telling the story of a man who had been so important to people from my community,” she recalls. “I said to myself – this is what I’m going to do. I’m going to be like Noxolo, and I’m going to tell stories.”

Three decades later, Ms. Makunga is the editor-in-chief of the Sowetan, one of South Africa’s most-circulated daily newspapers. She is part of a generation of women who have risen through the ranks to take leadership of many of the country’s most important news outlets. Today, these women – most of them Black, Asian, and multiracial – lead nearly half the country’s major publications and broadcasters, according to a recent analysis by Oxford University. That makes the country a global leader for women’s leadership in the media, putting it ahead of the United States, the United Kingdom, and even countries held up as models of gender parity, like Finland.

And the achievement is doubly remarkable in South Africa, where only a generation ago the entire country was run largely by white men. Editors like Ms. Makunga grew up not only with few role models who looked like them, but also in a world where the media was used as a weapon of the apartheid regime, premised on white supremacy – enforcing a hierarchy in which they were the bottom tier.

Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images/File

A vendor sells a Daily Sun edition honoring former South African President Nelson Mandela’s birthday on July 18, 2013. The country’s transition to democracy opened up opportunities for many of today’s journalists.

Hard-won gains

Even after apartheid formally ended, these editors came up in newsrooms where its effects lingered. They were told their accents were “too African,” or their looks “too tempting.” Even as the newsrooms around them began to change from mostly white to mostly not, they still found themselves edged out of the pub trips and golf games where their male colleagues networked their way to the top.

“Make no mistake: Those statistics changing are the result of a fight,” says Mahlatse Mahlase, group editor-in-chief of Eyewitness News, a major breaking-news broadcaster. Women in South Africa’s newsrooms “have fought racism and they’ve also fought the patriarchy. The discrimination came from every side.”

Although they’ve now arrived, many of these same leaders note that South Africa’s media transformation remains incomplete. Women hold few of journalism’s purse strings, for instance. Just 19% of the board members at media companies here are female, according to a 2018 academic study of women in the media called “Glass Ceilings.” The vast majority of the country’s major media houses have a male CEO.

And while the proportion of Black, Asian, and multiracial women in the top echelons of South African media companies has grown from 6% in 2006 to 30% in 2018, that number still lags, in a country where they represent 46% of the population, according to the Glass Ceilings survey. Once they get there, meanwhile, they’re often placed under intense scrutiny and pressure.

“When men get to the top of their profession, they’re celebrated. When women get there, particularly Black women, there’s backlash, there’s trolling, there’s bullying,” says Glenda Daniels, an associate professor of media studies at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and the co-author of the Glass Ceilings study. She uses the term “Black” as it is frequently applied in South Africa, to describe anyone who is not white. “Women at the top find they’re often exhausted just proving over and over that they deserve to be in the room.”

“Newsrooms figured out they needed to mimic what was happening in society so they wouldn’t end up on the wrong side of history.” – Mapula Nkosi, editor of the Daily Sun

Coming up the ladder

In 1994, the same year Nelson Mandela took the oath as South Africa’s first Black president, an ambitious young reporter named Mapula Nkosi walked into the Johannesburg newsroom of the Weekly Mail, which made its name opposing apartheid, to begin her career as a cadet reporter.

When she looked up the ranks, she says, she saw only men. But all around her, the country had a new buzzword: transformation. The process was often fuzzy, but the objective was clear: The structures that ruled the country should look more like the people who lived in it.

“Those newsrooms figured out they needed to mimic what was happening in society so they wouldn’t end up on the wrong side of history,” says Ms. Nkosi, now the editor of the Daily Sun, the country’s most-circulated daily newspaper. “The whole time I was coming up I had people on one side of me saying, ‘We don’t understand why you’re in this position,’ and people on the other side saying, ‘We are so excited to see where you go.’”

Those competing forces followed many of South Africa’s women journalists through their rise. Each time they pulled themselves up another rung on the ladder, they heard whispers – that they only got this job because leadership wanted a woman, that they’d never make it.

But when they did, the conversation changed.

“When you do well, you become almost genderless,” says Paula Fray, a media consultant and the first woman to edit the Saturday Star, a major South African newspaper. “But if you don’t do well, then your failings represent your whole gender.”

Meanwhile, women leaders in the newsroom “carry the added responsibility of making these environments more welcoming for women,” says Mary Papayya, a veteran journalist and editor who now sits on the board of the South African Broadcasting Corp. That, she notes, is a particularly difficult task at a time when many outlets have seen their budgets slashed and are now contending with a pandemic that has made news reporting both more dangerous and less lucrative.

And the fight for change goes beyond who sits in the corner office. In South Africa, like many countries, men are disproportionately both the experts and subjects of news stories. A recent analysis of the South African media’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic by the organization Media Monitoring Africa, for instance, found that 80% of those quoted in stories about the virus were men.

Ms. Mahlase, the radio news editor, says she sees these kinds of statistics through a new prism since she gave birth seven months ago to her first child, a boy. 

“I want my son to grow up in a world where he has female bosses,” she says. “I want him to grow up listening to women experts on the radio, hearing them as contributors to changing the world and not just as victims of an unfair system.”

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Trump Administration Penalizes Chinese Officials for Hong Kong Crackdown

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WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Friday imposed sanctions on 11 senior Chinese Communist Party officials and their Hong Kong allies, including chief executive Carrie Lam, over their role in cracking down on political dissent in the southern Chinese territory.

These are the first sanctions against officials from China and Hong Kong over suppression of pro-democracy protests and dissent in the territory. They are being imposed as actions following an executive order President Trump signed last month seeking to punish China for its repression in Hong Kong.

“The United States stands with the people of Hong Kong and we will use our tools and authorities to target those undermining their autonomy,” Steven T. Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, said in a statement.

The action is another in a series of measures the Trump administration has taken in recent months to ratchet up pressure on Beijing. Last month, the administration imposed sanctions on the Chinese government, including a senior member of the Communist Party, over human rights abuses against the largely Muslim Uighur minority.

Beijing announced in June that it was imposing a new national security law in Hong Kong to grant security agencies expansive powers to crack down on dissent.

Since then, American officials have debated how to get Beijing to roll back the law or how to penalize the action.

Last month, Mr. Trump signed an executive order ending the special status that the United States grants Hong Kong in diplomatic and trade relations, saying Hong Kong was no longer an autonomous entity, and officials are now beginning to treat the territory like mainland China.

Some administration officials had wanted Mr. Trump to announce during the signing that his government was imposing sanctions on Ms. Lam and other officials in China and Hong Kong. The president declined to do so then.

The current flurry of actions against China dovetails with a core part of Mr. Trump’s campaign strategy. His campaign aides are trying to show Mr. Trump is hitting China hard in order to shift the national conversation from his failures on managing the coronavirus pandemic and the economy.

The initial virus outbreak began in central China, and Mr. Trump has blamed Chinese officials for failing to contain it, though he also praised China’s leader, Xi Jinping, for efforts this winter.

Some of the administration’s China hawks are trying to set the two nations on a course for long-term confrontation and ensure that relations remain in a state of open rivalry even if Democratic candidate Joseph R. Biden Jr. wins the November election.

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